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healthy diet

  • Spring Clean Your Health

    By: Eryl McCaffrey 

    We can learn a lot from nature. If we align our lives with the cycles of the seasons, we’re much more likely to maintain a healthy balance in our bodies and minds over the course of the year. When the summer sun is Spring Cleanblazing and the air is moist, we should consume more water and enjoy the abundant natural supply of Vitamin D. Spring is the warm-up season – it prepares our minds and bodies for the oncoming heat, while allowing us to cleanse ourselves of frigid temperatures, sluggish bodies and sleepy moods. Spring offers a unique opportunity to tap into the energy we seemed to have collected over the colder months - let’s spring clean ourselves just like we spring clean our homes!

    Four tips to spring clean your health:

    1. Give Herbal Tea a Try- Soak up the therapeutic benefits of soothing herbal teas like chamomile and peppermint as you bring your body back into balance. Reduce or eliminate coffee from your diet and try green tea if you’re craving a caffeinated boost. Mild flavored herbal teas usually don’t require sweeteners to taste delicious, an added benefit to those of us avoiding sugar.
    2. Get Outside- It doesn’t matter what you do once you’re in nature, just be sure to turn off your phone and intentionally unplug yourself for 30 minutes or longer each day. Reconnect to the greenery around you by practicing yoga, going for a walk, hike, bike or even taking a quiet moment on a park bench. Being in nature has been proven to ease anxiety and depression and it also provides us with an opportunity to activate our serotonin.
    3. Set an Intention- Get out your journal, laptop, phone or voice-recorder and set an intention for Spring of 2016. Be clear about what you want to let go of from the past few months and what you want to achieve this season. More importantly, zero in on how you want to feel in your mind and body over the next few months. Keep it simple and focused. Are you craving a stronger sense of inner peace? If so, ask yourself what steps you need to take in order to access that. Often the act of focusing on what we truly want to improve or strengthen allows us to set our life in that direction. Keeping mindful and consistent goals can prevent anxiety and put us at ease as well!
    4. Eat What’s in Season- Check out what your local market has to offer on the fruit and vegetable front and do your best to buy what’s in season. In doing so, you are aligning your body with the natural goodness of what the Earth has to offer. Many fruits and vegetables offer a variety of nutrients. On top of that, you will be supporting community businesses. It’s a win-win!
  • Depression and Carbs: Why Your Cravings May Say More About Your Mood Than Your Self-Control

    Winter DepressionIf winter weather triggers carbohydrate cravings, you're not alone. Many people snack more on carbohydrate-containing foods in winter, sometimes in an unconscious effort to boost their mood, says Judith Wurtman, PhD, a former scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and co-author of The Serotonin Power Diet. How can you tell if your seasonal carbohydrate cravings are in the normal range or a possible symptom of winter depression?

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  • How to Stick to Your Diet Plan

    It's self-improvement season, but you may find yourself losing motivation. Follow these tips to stay motivated in your diet plan, and achieve your goals.

    Set Realistic Expectations

    You can pick any diet you like, but if you expect to see any significant results in a day, a week, or even a month you’ll set yourself up for failure. When you start restricting what you eat, it feels like you’ve made major sacrifices and deserve some sort of payoff—or at least an indication—that your hard work will make a difference.

    Unfortunately, you won’t get that kind of immediate satisfaction. All diets take commitment and you won’t see results quickly. But if waiting three months or so to see a significant change seems like a lot, think about all the years you’ve spent trying to meet your goals. Consider the diets you’ve tried and the cumulative time they took. You probably spent quite awhile on plans that didn’t work. Sticking with one that you like for a few months likely adds up to a fraction of that “wasted” time.

    Diet Plans: Not just another disappointment Diet Plans Don't Always End in Failure

    Pick a Sustainable Program

    You can’t approach a diet successfully without knowing how you relate to your food. You need to understand what you like, what you don’t, what you expect to crave, and so on. Your personal needs play an enormous role in the way you’ll react to the healthy changes you want to make, so you have to know yourself well in order to pick a program you can sustain. Bellatti suggests that you ask yourself a few questions to find out what may or may not fit:

    “Don't approach this as "choosing a diet", but rather "choosing an eating style." Unlike a diet, an eating style is sustainable, can be done for the rest of the life, and implies more flexibility. Ask yourself: "Can I eat this way the vast majority of the time?". If the answer is "yes," you've made a good choice. If the answer is "no," choose something else. If this way of eating requires you to live beyond your means, rely on ingredients/foods that are not easily accessible, or inconveniences your daily routine, it's unlikely you'll be able to stick with it for long."

    Choose a Diet That Creates Good Habits

    If you’ve found an “eating style” you think you can sustain, you’ve whittled down your options to the best. Before you choose one, however, you ought to consider a few more things. As Bellatti explains, habits are key:

    “The whole purpose of choosing a better eating style is, usually, to improve health, and the best way to do this is with consistent habits. Don't look for a way of eating that is so strict and limited that you can only stay sane if you do it for two weeks every four months; that isn't a recipe for meaningful results.”

    Of the habits you create, Bellatti suggests you ought to get used to cooking more:

    “Above all, a healthful way of eating is low in processed foods. It should have you in the kitchen preparing food, as opposed to purchasing ready-made meals, pre-made shakes, or processed snack bars. Additionally, if you become dependent on "diet foods", what happens the day they are no longer sold? That said, choose a way of eating that enables you to still have a social life. You should be able to go to most restaurants and order something—even if just an appetizer and a side dish—that meets your needs.”

    Don’t Forget to Exercise

    You don’t have to spend tons of time exercising, but you can’t ignore physical activity because you’ve chosen a healthier diet. The two go hand-in-hand. You can’t simply work out and live off of donuts. Dr. Stewart agrees:

    “Make sure that any weight loss program you consider is partnered with a solid and consistent amount of physical activity. If the program you're considering looks good but doesn't contain any specific exercise information, consult your doctor to design a safe and comprehensive exercise program.”

    Just as with your diet, you want an exercise routine that you can sustain, grow with, and even enjoy. Don’t try too much too fast. Take your time and let your confidence build as you grow stronger. As with all health goals, you can’t achieve them overnight. Aim to continue to better your physical health and wellness with every step, and the rest will follow.

    Consult a Professional Before You Jump In

    You have a unique body with its own set of dietary issues. One great diet that works for many of your friends may not work so well for you. Before you dive in, Dr. Stewart recommends that you talk to a professional:

    “Many of the structured diets advertised these days are gimmicks and nothing more, and some can actually damage your health. In order to make the best choice, it's important to put some thought into it and consult professionals. To begin with, speak with your primary care physician. Discuss your situation in depth; what your particular health issues and goals are and how to select a diet that will best address these.”

    This post offers advice but you should never make major changes that affect your health solely based on something you read online. Talk to your doctor or a registered dietitian before you significantly change the way you eat.

    (Source: Lifehacker – “How to Create a Diet Plan That Doesn't Suck and Actually Stick to It” by
    Adam Dachis, Published on 9/23/2013)

  • Natural Sugars and Holiday Treats

    The holidays are upon us, and that means lots of holiday parties and get-togethers will be filling our calendars in the weeks to come. There will be plenty of opportunities to connect with family and friends, while indulging in yummy foods and tasty drinks galore. But wait! That means lots of extra sugar too!

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  • Living with Diabetes

    There are two types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Patients with type 1 diabetes struggle with insulin production because their immune systems actually destroy the cells that release insulin. Insulin is the hormone that helps the body control the level of glucose in the blood. A lack of insulin means cells cannot absorb sugar (glucose) and use it properly for energy.  Continue reading

  • Men’s Health - Eating, Wellness and Work-Life balance

    Some studies show men seem to be less concerned about their health than women are. Men may be more likely to smoke and/or drink, they may be more willing to put themselves into dangerous or risky situations and they may be less disciplined when it comes to scheduling regular check-ups and screenings with their doctors. doc

    This, of course, is a generalization. There are plenty of men out there who are on top of their medical needs and pay close attention to their health and fitness. Still, we thought we’d take a quick look at some of the health issues that concern men the most. We’d like to offer the guys a few tips on how to eat for optimal health, as well as some suggestions for achieving a healthy work-life balance.

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  • Changes in the Brain

    Change happens

    brainIt’s a well-known fact that, with age, our brains change. They not only change in size (unfortunately, they get smaller) but they also change in terms of regular functioning and susceptibility to certain illnesses such as stroke and dementia. Changes in levels of neurotransmitters and levels of hormones generally lead to some form of memory impairment that comes with age.

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  • Obesity: A growing problem in Canada

    The obesity rate in Canada has almost tripled in the last 30 years. According to Statistics Canada, last year 53.6% of Canadian adults were overweight or obese, and 20.7% of Canadian youth were overweight or obese.

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  • The Right Way to Snack at Work

    We’ve all experienced it – that late afternoon dip in energy, followed by powerful cravings and the desperate need for a SNACK.

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  • The Lowdown on Fibre

    There are two types of fibre out there – soluble and insoluble. Many of us don’t know the difference between the two, and most of us aren’t getting enough of either type of fibre on a daily basis.

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